Tuesday, April 15, 2014

Pat Summitt's Dog, Sally Sue, Dies

Pat Summitt's yellow lab, Sally Sue, had to be euthanized Monday because of a brain tumor.

Katie Wynn, Summitt's secretary, said Tuesday the tumor was inoperable.

The 13-year-old dog was featured in the ESPN film "XO" and was seen comforting Summitt when she broke down while talking about her coaching career coming to an end.

Summitt's official biography on UTSports.com mentions Sally Sue twice: "(Summitt) has always been an intense, demanding, focused, bright-blue-steely-eyed competitor who is also a very caring, family-oriented person who enjoys a great walk on the beach with the family dogs, Sally Sue and Sadie."

Monday, April 14, 2014

New York Picks Tennessee's Meighan Simmons In WNBA Draft

The New York Liberty got the steal of the night at Mohegan Sun Arena, snagging Tennessee's Meighan Simmons, the 2014 Associated Press SEC Player of the Year, with the 26th overall selection of the WNBA Draft.

Simmons, who lasted until the second pick of the third round, continued Tennessee's rich history in the WNBA Draft, becoming the 38th player to join the league.

Monday, April 07, 2014

Ask Congress To Honor Alzheimer's Advocate, Pat Summitt

Ever since her diagnosis with early-onset Alzheimer's in 2011, legendary NCAA women's basketball coach, Pat Summitt, has taken on the disease with her signature game plan. She started the Pat Summitt Foundation with her son to help speed progress towards a cure and she's devoted her life to raising awareness and fighting the needless stigma associated with the disease.

Help honor her efforts and raise awareness of the growing prevalence of Alzheimer's by asking Congress to co-sponsor the Pat Summitt Congressional Gold Medal Act.

Click here to ask your congressional representatives to co-sponsor the Pat Summitt Congressional Gold Medal Act (H.R.3836 and S.1910).

Sunday, April 06, 2014

Pat and Tyler

Tyler and I are honored by the recent exhibit. It's beautiful!

Saturday, April 05, 2014

Pat Summitt: A Legendary Lady

Because of her early-onset dementia Pat Summitt admitted in her book released last year there are times when she is unable to remember the many milestones and accomplishments of her career.

Her multitude of fans will never forget.

The Clarksville native who grew up in Henrietta and played basketball at Cheatham County High, won 1,098 games, 32 SEC championships and eight national championships in her 38 years as Tennessee's women's basketball coach.

Those are the highlights. The feats that roll off the tongues of diehard Lady Vols fans.

There are no categories or lists, however, which illustrate the positive impact Summitt, 61, had on the young women who played for her or the inspiration she provided for the countless little girls who attended her summer basketball camps or watched UT play.

Then there was the enormous competition she placed on her counterparts, unmeasurable pressure that forced them to elevate their game and in the process improve women's college basketball across the board.

Her legacy will not only be the seven times she was named NCAA Coach of the Year or the six halls of fame in which she has been inducted. But also her high personal standards like the bold and conscientious stand she took against girls high school players having to play the six-on-six style after most states had moved away from it.

Three players played offense and three on defense because it was deemed it was too strenuous for any to actually run the full length of the floor.

Summitt thought that was foolish and didn't hesitate to let the Tennessee Secondary Schools Athletic Association know it.

In just her second year as the coach at UT (1976), she testified in a lawsuit that challenged the six-on-six rule in court. Gil Gideon, executive director of the TSSAA at the time, testified that girls could better develop their skills if they didn't have to endure the "strain" it takes to run the full court.

While not issuing an injunction, the judge did direct the TSSAA to change to five-on-five for girls.

The TSSAA appealed and Summitt, not being one to back down from a challenge, became even more adamant with her stance. She let it be known that she would not sign another in-state high school player as long as the TSSAA continued playing six-on-six.

Two years later the TSSAA buckled and voted to approve the five-on-five style.

"Even then, Pat was a force," former Knoxville Journal sports writer Randy Moore wrote. "Single-handedly banishing six-girl basketball from Tennessee high schools is just one example of Pat's devotion to elevating her sport."

Summitt's career winning percentage was .844, but she always deflected the credit to her players.

"I remind people that I've never scored a basket for the University of Tennessee," she told the New York Times as she approached her 1,000th victory.

The recognition Summitt has received through the years spanned beyond basketball.

In 1997 she was honored by Working Mother magazine at the White House and named one of "25 Most Influential Working Mothers."

In 2007 U.S. News & World Report named her one of "Americas Best Leaders," and in 2012 she received the Presidential Medal of Freedom.

A mind-boggling 74 former Lady Vols players, assistants and graduate assistants followed in her footsteps and became coaches. Seventeen are currently college head coaches.

Thursday, April 03, 2014

UT Signee's 15 Leads West to McDonald's Win

The Tennessee women's basketball program had a pair of future players in action Wednesday night in the McDonald's All America Game at the United Center, and both made plays to help their teams.

After Alexa Middleton starred on Monday night by winning the skills competition and three-point shootout at the Powerade Jam Fest, Jaime Nared stepped into the spotlight on Wednesday by leading the West to victory over Middleton's East squad, 80-78.

Nared, a 6-foot-1 wing who hails from Westview High School in Portland, Ore., followed in the footsteps of her future Lady Vol teammates and fellow Oregonians Mercedes Russell (Springfield H.S.) and Jordan Reynolds (Portland Central Catholic H.S.). For the night, Nared (pronounced Nard) scored a team-leading 15 points in 17 minutes and finished six-of-11 from the field, went three-of-three from the charity stripe and snared four rebounds.

A year ago, Russell earned game MVP honors with 16 points, 12 rebounds and three blocks, while Reynolds contributed 10 points, 11 boards, three assists and a steal in the West's victory.

Middleton, a 5-9 guard from Murfreesboro, Tenn. (Riverdale H.S.) became the first McDonald's All-American to win two events in the Powerade Jam Fest. Two days later, she capped a 16-4 run for the East by draining a three-pointer from the left wing to lift her team into the lead, 37-36, during the first half after trailing 32-25 at one point. She finished with three points, five assists and four rebounds in 20 minutes of action.

Tennessee expects to open the 2014-15 campaign with no fewer than seven McDonald's All-Americans on its roster. In addition to Middleton, Nared, Reynolds and Russell, the Lady Vols also have Cierra Burdick, Bashaara Graves and Ariel Massengale returning. UT's third fall 2013 signee, 6-1 wing Kortney Dunbar from Edwardsville, Ill., was a McDonald's nominee for her state and will be playing in the first-ever SchollyMe All-World Game along with Middleton on April 19 in Irvine, Calif.

Annual Forget Me Not 5K Benefits Those with Alzheimer's

The fifth annual Forget Me Not 5K will take place Saturday beginning at 9 a.m. at the Loudon County Visitor Center in Lenoir City. Proceeds from the race will benefit The Pat Summitt Foundation and Alzheimer's research.

Although the race has boomed from 100 runners in its first year to an expected 800 at this year's event, the Forget Me Not 5K's origin story is somewhat "unconventional," race director Angela Wampler said.

"My daughter, while home from college for summer, had a dream," Wampler said. "In her dream, she and I were running a 5K – which we often do. She looked at my shirt and it said 'The Forget Me Not 5K for Alzheimer's.' My mom has the disease. So we decided to act on her dream."

Before joining forces with Summitt, the race took place twice and donated proceeds to the Cole Neuroscience Center, a research institute for Alzheimer's research. But upon hearing of Summitt's early onset dementia, the race gained a new focus.

"After Pat was diagnosed, we thought it was a perfect partnership to work with her foundation to fight this dreaded disease," Steve Harrelson, another of the race's coordinators, said.

On race day, there will be a pre-race party as runners arrive and sign in. Refreshments will be provided both before and after the race. Wampler said the event is followed by a party including a disk jockey and door prizes such as signed basketballs.

"Fingers crossed Pat will be there," Wampler said. "She is our hero and needs our help to fight this fight against such a fierce opponent."

For more information and to register for the race, www.forgetmenot5k.com.

Tennessee Sports Hall of Fame Opens Pat Summitt Exhibit

The Tennessee Sports Hall of Fame, located inside the Bridgestone Arena, has announced a new, permanent Pat Summitt Exhibit that will open on Friday, the first day of activities at the 2014 NCAA Women's Final Four.

The Nashville Local Organizing Committee (NLOC) is providing free admission to the Pat Summitt Exhibit from April 4th-8th, allowing basketball fans to experience the new exhibit during their time in Nashville, Tennessee.

The Pat Summitt Exhibit will feature memorabilia, photos, videos and interactive displays highlighting the former women’s college basketball coach.
Now serving as head coach emeritus of the Tennessee Lady Vols basketball team, Coach Summitt holds the most all-time wins for a coach in NCAA basketball history of either a men’s or women’s team in any division.

She coached from 1974 to 2012, all with the Lady Vols, winning eight NCAA national championships, second only to the record 10 titles won by UCLA men’s coach John Wooden.

She is the only coach in NCAA history, and one of three college coaches overall, with at least 1,000 victories.

“Pat Summitt has been the single most influential person in women’s sports,” said Bill Emendorfer, executive director, Tennessee Sports Hall of Fame. “As a native Tennessean, her roots and values run deep with the heritage of this great state. It seems fitting to open the Pat Summitt Exhibit during the Women’s Final Four. The exhibit offers a unique opportunity to follow this Tennessee legend from her youth to her career as both a player and coach. It will be an opportunity to catch a glimpse of how Coach Summitt rose from a Tennessee farm girl to a national legend.”

The Pat Summitt Exhibit at the Tennessee Sports Hall of Fame will open to the public on Friday, April 4th from 10:00am to 5:00pm.

The exhibit will also be open; Saturday, April 5th, 9:00am to 5:00pm, Sunday April 6th, 10:00am to 9:30pm. (Game Night), Monday April 7th, 10:00am to 5:00pm, and Tuesday, April 8th, 10:00am to 10:00pm. (Game Night).

“Our NLOC decided early in the process that we needed to leave our community with a lasting legacy of celebrating women’s basketball and women’s athletics. Working closely with the Tennessee Sports Hall of Fame, we committed to opening this Pat Summitt exhibit in Nashville during Final Four week. What better way to celebrate Tennessee’s own Coach Pat Summitt than with 30,000 basketball fans,” said Margaret Behm, co-chair, Nashville Local Organizing Committee. “Coach Summitt changed women’s basketball in this state and in our country and we are proud to be a part of this living legacy that celebrates her amazing career.”

The Tennessee Sports Hall of Fame is located inside the Bridgestone Arena, 501 Broadway in Nashville. For more information, visit www.tshf.net.

Wednesday, April 02, 2014

Tyler Summitt Names Mickie DeMoss Associate Head Coach

Mickie DeMoss

RUSTON, La. - It didn't take Tyler Summitt long to make a splash as the sixth head coach of the Louisiana Tech Lady Techsters.

During the noontime press conference at the Jarrell Room of the Charles Wyly Athletic Center, Summitt announced that he has hired former Lady Techster Mickie DeMoss as his associate head coach.

With the hire, Summitt adds a 35-year veteran of the collegiate coaching ranks and someone that he is very familiar with from her 20 years as an assistant and associate head coach at the University of Tennessee.

“I am very excited to have Mickie as our associate head coach,” Summitt said. “Mickie has always been family to me so it is only fitting that she joins us back here with the Louisiana Tech family. I respect Mickie and see her not only as a friend but a mentor, and I will be relying on her expertise moving forward.”

DeMoss is widely known by the Louisiana Tech faithful as she was a player on the inaugural Lady Techster team in 1974 and lettered for the first three years of the program’s existence.

“I am very excited about coming back to Louisiana Tech, particularly coming with Tyler,” DeMoss said. “I believe in his ability to get things going again at Tech and re-establish the tradition. I believe in the program at Tech and what has been accomplished in the past. In my heart I believe that we can get a very competitive program back at Louisiana Tech. I am also very excited about being back close to my family.”

DeMoss spent the past two years as an assistant coach with the WNBA’s Indiana Fever, helping guide the franchise to the 2012 WNBA championship. She was a part of six national championships and 12 Final Four teams at Tennessee before reviving the Kentucky Wildcats program where she was named the 2006 SEC Coach of the Year during her four years as the head coach.

Her coaching career also includes a three-year stint as an assistant coach to Gail Goestenkors at Texas.

During a span from 1985-86 to 2002-03, DeMoss helped lead the Lady Vols to six national titles and 12 trips to the Final Four. DeMoss took the coaching reins at Kentucky for the 2003-04 season and later spent time at Texas before returning to Rocky Top in 2010-11.

During her first 18 seasons at UT, the Lady Vols amassed a 554-77 (.878) overall record. DeMoss was promoted to associate head coach in 2000, but stepped aside three years later to lead her own program.

In four seasons at Kentucky, she guided the Wildcats to a 71-56 record including consecutive 20-win seasons and three postseason appearances (one NCAA and two WNIT).

The 2006 SEC Coach of the Year honor was a first for a UK coach, as she guided the 22-9 Wildcats to the NCAA Tournament for the first time in seven seasons and punctuated the trip with an NCAA win. The breakout year also included a victory over No. 1-ranked Tennessee, 66-63, in front of a school-record crowd of 13,689 at Rupp Arena. It marked the first win over a top-ranked team in UK history. In 2006-07, Kentucky was 20-14 and advanced to the WNIT. That season, DeMoss' Cats attracted a school record attendance of 5,863 fans per game.

She elected to step aside as head coach at Kentucky in April 2007, but her coaching hiatus ended when she accepted an assistant coaching position at the University of Texas in the summer of 2007. She was the Longhorns' top recruiter while also coaching the post game.

Over the past three decades, DeMoss has cemented a reputation as one of the country’s most elite coaches. A survey of the nation's NCAA Division I women's head basketball coaches tabbed her as the top assistant in the country in 2000. She also garnered that distinction from a 1998 The Women's Basketball Journal poll.

While at UT, DeMoss was considered a great technical mind, floor coach and entertainer. Off the court, she was regarded as one of the best recruiters in the college game, year after year recruiting future All-SEC and All-America award-winners, while stockpiling rosters with the kind of players essential to winning national championships.

Some of DeMoss' most notable recruits at Tennessee include: Tonya Edwards, the 1987 Final Four MVP, Dena Head, the 1992 SEC Player of the Year, Chamique Holdsclaw, the 1996 and 1997 Final Four MVP, and Tamika Catchings, a four-time All-American and current star of the Fever.

Noted for her success coaching post players, DeMoss protégés have represented Team USA in every Olympic Games since 1992.

Prior to joining the Tennessee staff in 1985, DeMoss had been an assistant coach at Auburn University (1983-85), a head coach at the University of Florida (1979-83) and an assistant at Memphis State (1977-79).

DeMoss received her undergraduate degree in physical education from Louisiana Tech University in 1977, where she starred at point guard. She then received her master's degree in education at Memphis State University in 1979. She is a native of Tallulah, La.

For complete coverage of Lady Techster Basketball, please follow @LATechWBB on Twitter and visit the official home of Louisiana Tech Athletics at LATechSports.com.

Tyler Summitt Introduced as Louisiana Tech Head Coach

Summitt becomes 6th head coach in program history



RUSTON, La. - When Tyler Summitt was introduced Wednesday as the sixth head coach in Louisiana Tech women's basketball history, it wasn't the first time that the 23-year-old had been to Ruston.

Tyler, the son of legendary Hall of Fame coach Pat Summitt, followed the Tennessee Lady Vols and his mother to the Thomas Assembly Center numerous times during the course of one of the greatest rivalries in the history of the women's game.

"As I grew up as a part of the Tennessee Lady Vols program, everything on and off the floor was geared towards competing against Louisiana Tech," Tyler said. "The Lady Techsters were the standard in which excellence in women's basketball was measured for so long. I am proud to be a part of this storied program."

Louisiana Tech Athletics Director Tommy McClelland made a bold hire that could pay huge dividends for a Lady Techster program that ranks second all-time in wins (1,043), trailing only Tennessee.

Tyler's challenge is to rebuild the storied program back into a conference contender and annual NCAA Tournament participant. Tech's 27 NCAA Tournament appearances ranks fourth all-time although the Lady Techsters have not made an appearance since 2011.

"Tyler represents our philosophy of developing champions in the classroom, on the court and in life," McClelland said. "He grew up in that championship culture, and it is all he knows. His reputation as a great recruiter, a rising young star in the coaching business and a passionate leader is known throughout the nation. We are fortunate to have him lead our women's basketball program into the future."

He replaces Teresa Weatherspoon, who recorded a 99-71 record over the past five-plus seasons. Weatherspoon guided Tech to postseason appearances during her first three seasons, including a pair of NCAA Tournaments, before failing to qualify for the postseason over the past three years.

"(My wife) AnDe and I are grateful and humbled for the opportunity to become a part of the Louisiana Tech Family," Tyler said. "I am honored to lead our women's basketball team, which is an absolute gem in the women's game with an incredible tradition. To our Lady Techster fans, AnDe and I look forward to getting to know you all very soon. I am excited to help every member of our program be the best that they can be through our five standards: belief, family, character, competition, toughness."

Tyler spent the past two seasons as an assistant coach at Marquette University under head coach Terri Mitchell where he oversaw the team's offense while overseeing skill development for every position. He also served as the scouting coordinator.

"Tyler Summitt is an amazingly talented individual with tremendous character and leadership skills that will unquestionably propel him to success in life," said Louisiana Tech President Les Guice. "I am absolutely thrilled to have him leading our Lady Techsters basketball program and am confident that he can return our program to national prominence."

His hiring has already brought positive reaction from some of those closest to the Lady Techster program.

"I really respect and appreciate the commitment that President (Les) Guice and Tommy McClelland have shown to this program with this hire," said Louisiana Tech head coach emeritus Leon Barmore. "They have put the Lady Techster program in the forefront. I met with Tyler. What I found out in the 45 minutes we spent together was that he truly respects this program. We certainly respect him and his family. In time he will prove to be an outstanding head coach. I know he is 23 years old, but he has been coaching since he was one. I really like the direction we have gone. I think this is a really good hire. I am fired up about it."

In addition to his coaching duties in the collegiate ranks, Tyler is also a co-founder and board member of The Pat Summitt Foundation, participates in public speaking engagements and is active in church with his wife.

"It is a special day for our family, and especially for Tyler, as he is given the reigns to one of the most storied programs in women's basketball," said Pat Summitt. "We are excited about the opportunity he has been given and are grateful to Tommy McClelland and Dr. Leslie Guice for having faith in Tyler. He has been preparing for this day since he was a little boy, and I can assure you he will work very hard and will represent Louisiana Tech University with class. I'm sure Tyler is ready to get busy, and I know he and AnDe look forward to becoming part of the Louisiana Tech family and the Ruston community."

He graduated from the University of Tennessee Chancellor's Honors Program where he was a member of the Tennessee men's basketball team for two seasons, learning from Cuonzo Martin and Bruce Pearl.

"Tyler is one of the brightest young minds in college basketball," said Pearl, who recently accepted the head men's job at Auburn. "Tyler is so wise beyond his years, understands the game and has a proven system. I would hire him at Auburn if it weren't for this head coaching opportunity at LA Tech."

Tyler also served as a student assistant coach for his mother and the Tennessee women's basketball program. He was actively involved in the 2007 through 2009 seasons for the Tennessee women, two of which resulted in national championships.

He was the head coach of numerous AAU teams in Tennessee, including the Tennessee Fury 17U who went on to win the State Championship. He has also been a head coach at the Pat Summitt, Cuonzo Martin and Bruce Pearl Summer Camps from 2005-2011.

"Tyler told me, `There's only one environment I know. That is a championship environment, and I will bring that to practice, to work and to games every single day,'" said Mitchell, his former head coach at Marquette. "He absolutely delivered on that promise. He's going to be a star in our profession."

Tyler married his high school sweetheart, Anne Dennis ("AnDe") Ragsdale Summitt, on June 1, 2013.

His hiring is pending the approval of the Board of Supervisors for the University of Louisiana System.

For complete coverage of Lady Techster Basketball, please follow @LATechWBB on Twitter and visit the official home of Louisiana Tech Athletics at LATechSports.com.

What Others are Saying about Tyler Summitt

Tommy McClelland, Athletics Director at Louisiana Tech

"Tyler represents our philosophy of developing champions in the classroom, on the court and in life. He grew up in that championship culture and it is all he knows. His reputation as a great recruiter, a rising young star in the coaching business and a passionate leader is known throughout the nation. We are fortunate to have him lead our women's basketball program into the future."

Dr. Les Guice, Louisiana Tech President

"Tyler Summitt is an amazingly talented individual with tremendous character and leadership skills that will unquestionably propel him to success in life. I am absolutely thrilled to have him leading our Lady Techsters basketball program and am confident that he can return our program to national prominence."

Pat Summitt, Tennessee Lady Vols Head Coach Emeritus (and Tyler's mom)

"It is a special day for our family, and especially for Tyler, as he is given the reigns to one of the most storied programs in women's basketball. We are excited about the opportunity he has been given and are grateful to Athletic Director Tommy McClelland and University President Dr. Leslie Guice for having faith in Tyler. He has been preparing for this day since he was a little boy, and I can assure you he will work very hard and will represent Louisiana Tech University with class. I'm sure Tyler is ready to get busy, and I know he and AnDe look forward to becoming part of the Louisiana Tech family and the Ruston community."

R.B. Summitt II, Tyler's Dad

"It is such a humbling but exciting moment. We are proud for Tyler and for Louisiana Tech. I think we can mark down this day as exceptional, a date to be remembered, sort of like your child's birthday: the emotions, the expectations, the hopes of a new beginning. Tyler has been praying, planning and building for just such a wonderful opportunity. There aren't enough words to thank Louisiana Tech University and all the loyal fans. I know you have hired a winner and great days are ahead.

Leon Barmore, Louisiana Tech Lady Techster Head Coach Emeritus

"I really respect and appreciate the commitment that President (Les) Guice and (Athletics Director) Tommy McClelland have shown to this program with this hire. They have put the Lady Techster program in the forefront. I met with Tyler (Monday). What I found out in the 45 minutes we spent together was that he truly respects this program. We certainly respect him and his family. In time he will prove to be an outstanding head coach. I know he is 23 years old, but he has been coaching since he was one. I really like the direction we have gone. I think this is a really good hire. I am fired up about it."

Joan Cronan (Women's Athletic Director Emeritus for the University of Tennessee)

"When combining the tradition of LA Tech with the potential of Tyler Summitt, I think you have a winning combination. I have literally known Tyler since birth, and I have been impressed with his maturity and work ethic from an early age. Tyler possesses many wonderful qualities, but the three I most admire are his character, communication skills and Christian values. This hire reflects the tradition of excellence of women's basketball at LA Tech."

Bruce Pearl (Head Coach for Auburn Men's Basketball)

"Tyler is one of the brightest young minds in college basketball. Tyler is so wise beyond his years, understands the game and has a proven system. I would hire him at Auburn if it weren't for this head coaching opportunity at LA Tech."

Billie Moore (Former Head Coach for US Olympic Team, UCLA, Cal. State-Fullerton)

"Tyler has a special gift. He has a talent for teaching, a unique perspective of seeing and understanding the concepts and strategies of the game. Tyler is great with people; he is a tremendous communicator and a natural leader - things that have nothing to do with age. Quite simply, he has `it' and there is absolutely no question in my mind that he will be a successful head coach."

Cuonzo Marton (Head Coach for Tennessee Men's Basketball)

"Tyler has a tremendous work ethic and has the basketball knowledge. All his life he's been around the best that ever coached the game so he understands what it takes."

Terri Mitchell (Head Coach for Marquette Women's Basketball)

"Tyler told me, `There's only one environment I know. That is a championship environment, and I will bring that to practice, to work and to games every single day.' He absolutely delivered on that promise. He's going to be a star in our profession."

Danielle Donehew (Associate Commissioner for Women's Basketball at The American Athletic Conference)

"Tyler Summitt has a talent that is rare to find at any age. His basketball IQ includes lessons from many of our game's legends. He is committed to the student-athlete, excellence, discipline and his family. Tyler is a born leader and will be a successful head coach. I am certain Tyler will leave his fingerprints on our game in his own special way."

Dave Hart (Athletic Director for University of Tennessee)

"Tyler Summitt is a rising star in the coaching profession. He is mature well beyond his years as a young professional. He has superb knowledge of the game of basketball, is a tireless recruiter who connects with prospects and players alike and his passion will galvanize every key University constituent."

Click here to watch the press conference.

Listen to the press conference.




Photos from the press conference. Click to view larger image.




  


  


  


  


  


  

Pat Summitt in Finals of ESPN Radio Coaches Bracket Contest

The Vols and Lady Vols may be out of the NCAA Tournament, but now you can help at least one Vol legend top a national bracket.

Pat Summitt is in the finals of ESPN Radio's "Coaches Bracket" contest.

She's matched up against Penn State football legend Joe Paterno, but as of Wednesday afternoon, Coach Summitt is trailing.

Click here to cast your vote.